Municipal Pollution Prevention Project

Spill kits distributed are a collection of absorbent materials that are put together to cleanup and prevent accidental spills that may occur on an industrial job site from reaching stormsewers or leaving the site. Catch basin inserts are designed to catch sediment and pollutants that wash into the stormwater drain. In 2016, the District worked with 4 of our Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) communities to distribute 9 spill kits and 2 catch basin inserts to assist in leak and spill prevention and municipal yard sediment control. MS4’s are required by New York State to have a pollution prevention plan in place as part of their stormwater management program.





City of Rochester Rain Garden

The Trailhead Improvement Project was designed to contribute to the overall, ongoing strategy for the development of the Genesee Riverway Trail and Turning Point Park. The Genesee Riverway Trail establishes a connection along the river and through the gorge from the southern tip of the city limits to the Port of Rochester on Lake Ontario. Recognizing the intrinsic value of the waterfront and gorge, the City has invested in trail development and improvement in the past five years. The Turning Point Park trail section runs along the west side of the river. This trail has seen a substantial increase in visitors and a subsequent spike in demand for safe, convenient parking. It was determined that the existing lot must be expanded.

A Rain Garden was installed adjacent to the parking lot to address the issue of runoff. This Rain Garden had two purposes: determine if a rain garden successfully collected the runoff and, to have an example to show citizens alternate ways of dealing with water runoff on their property. By placing informational signage at the Rain Garden site, the public was educated in incorporating rain gardens into their own neighborhoods.

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Town of Greece Cul-de-sac Retrofit

A Green Infrastructure was contructed to replace an existing, old-style cul-de-sac on a segment of road in the Town of Greece. This cul-de-sac captures untreated stormwater runoff from the roadway as well as several of the nearby paved driveways and directs that runoff to the center of the cul-de-sac, where the bioretention has been installed. Directing untreated stormwater runoff from the roadway and driveways reduces the amount of polluted stormwater runoff from entering the stormwater sewer system and ultimately discharging into Lake Ontario. The project's additional purpose was to filter the multitude of pollutants of concern from the otherwise untreated stormwater.

The project disconnected 2.2 acres of pervious and impervious surfaces that drained into the storm sewer system, ultimately discharging about 2,067,765 gallons of the untreated stormwater runoff into Lake Ontario. Another goal of this project was to design and construct a bioretention cell for public demonstration and education.

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Town of Webster Bioretention

The purpose of the project was to capture untreated stormwater runoff from the Webster Town Hall and parking lot directing runoff into a bioretention cell. Directing untreated stormwater runoff from the rooftop and parking lot will reduce the amount of untreated stormwater runoff from entering the stormwater sewer system and ultimately discharging into Mill Creek. Additionally, this project is designed to help filter the multitude of pollutants of concern from the otherwise untreated stormwater.

The project installed two bioretention cells to capture untreated stormwater runoff from the Webster Town Hall and parking lot. Untreated stormwater runoff was conveyed into a series of catch basins and the associated stormwater sewer system that outlets into Mill Creek, a known impaired waterbody. These bioretention cells capture and treat 1.4 acres of impervious surfaces consisting of rooftop and parking lots. Another goal of this project was to design and construct a bioretention cell for public demonstration and education.

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Village of Pittsford Porous Pavement

The purpose of the project was to remove the Village's existing broken-down impervious parking lot and install a pervious porous asphalt parking lot. Additionally, the purpose of this project was to help filter the multitude of pollutants of concern from the otherwise untreated stormwater. Pollutants of concern for this waterbody include, organics such as PCBs, pesticides, silt/sediment, pathogens and nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous.

The project consisted of one site located behind the Village Hall in the Village of Pittsford, Monroe County. The project removed an existing dilapidated impervious parking lot to install a pervious porous asphalt parking lot. Pervious pavement allows for improved infiltration throughout an otherwise impervious surface.





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Page last updated: October 27, 2017